Red Blood Cells before PEMF

Red Blood Cells after PEMF

The pictures above are of red blood cells before and after a PEMF treatment. Taken using dark field microscopy, the first picture shows red blood cells that are stuck together. Simply stated, these cells have lost their charge and are no longer able to transport oxygen, uptake nutrients, or release toxins. A person with blood that looks like the first picture is often tired, fatigued, and may have high blood pressure. The cells should be free floating and bounce off each other, like you see in the second picture. The two pictures below were taken of the same individual a few days apart. The second picture was taken right after a PEMF treatment.

Your red blood cells were designed to deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and to deliver carbon dioxide to the lungs. In order to do this, the red blood cell, must be maximally flexible and have the greatest amount of surface area possible through which to release its oxygen molecules at the right place. The tissue which needs the oxygen may be accessed through a big vessel (an artery) or tiny vessel (called an arteriole).

When two, three or more red blood cells clump together it prevents the single cell from bending over to pass through the smaller arterioles. The result is that certain tissues do not get enough oxygen.

When this occurs the body through a complex process of chemical and neurologic messages signals the heart to pump harder causing high blood pressure. With higher blood pressure the cells may be able to be forced through. And perhaps they can for a time but eventually the heart muscle is overworked, enlarges, and becomes ineffective causing damage in many areas of your body. The most frequently discussed damage is that which occurs to the blood vessels. This can result in ruptures in the vessels in your brain causing a stroke.

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PEMF stands for Pulsed ElectroMagnetic Fields, which are widely used these days to improve circulation and cell metabolism.  When a cell (such as a red blood cell) is injured or ill, it does not hold its ideal charge. This causes red cells to “stick” together, making circulation slow. When a magnetic field passes through the red cell, the membrane becomes properly charged, allowing the cell to repel itself and keep itself separate from other red cells, thereby increasing circulation. In addition, PEMFs increase various chemicals in the blood vessel walls that cause the blood vessels to dilate, improving the amount of blood flowing through the vessels and therefore increasing the amount of oxygen delivered to the tissues.

Poor circulation makes tissues unhealthy and prone to disease and breakdown. Improved circulation helps tissues get the nutrition and oxygen they need, while expelling the waste they produce. Good circulation helps with tissue healing and regeneration.